Each year we take on a small number of graduates from a science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) background onto our graduate rotational programme, to provide a solid understanding of our organisation and a strong foundation to go on to become great SMEs or leaders of the future.

What we offer:

  • Two-year rotational programme
  • Experience weeks to broaden business acumen and commercial awareness
  • Membership of a relevant professional body
  • A bespoke development programme to help you to reach your full potential

Our programme is designed to challenge and enrich, establishing you alongside some of the leading engineers in the space industry. As a new graduate, you will gain invaluable experience and be given the opportunity to contribute to real satellite engineering programmes. You will be trusted with diverse, critical projects empowering you to build tools, features and infrastructure, often from scratch.

The programme rotations, tailored where possible to your strengths and interests, will give you the chance to work in some of our specialised teams, including:

  • Space system development
  • System architecture and strategy
  • Service and network engineering
  • Spectrum optimisation
  • Cloud virtualisation
  • Satellite operations
  • Cyber and security operations

After the two year rotation period, you will move into a permanent position that suits your continual development.

We offer a highly competitive salary plus strong employee benefits.

Sarah

Since joining our graduate programme in September 2018, Sarah Singleton has been appointed onto the Satellite Network & Applications Technical and Professional Committee at the IET, finished her first rotation in Product Group and has just joined the Chief Operating Office.

Amar

Amar Mody talks about his experience of joining Inmarsat as a graduate; the people he has worked with and exciting projects he has been involved in.

Jeremie

Jeremie Joannes joined our graduate programme in September 2017 and has recently started his last rotation, conducting an investigation to do with the European Space Agency’s Galileo navigation satellites.